david haskell, phd
mesoamerican archaeology
David L. Haskell, PhD
Columbus, Ohio
Profile

My research examines the social construction of difference and hierarchy, and thus political authority, through both ethnohistoric (utilizing 16th century Spanish and indigenous authored documents) and archaeological research. My ethnohistoric research analyzes the native conceptualization of hierarchy based in the principle of encompassing or subsuming the identities of subordinates, in effect making such subordinates aspects of a superior agent’s identity (rather than authors of their own lives and identities). This in turn allows for an archaeological consideration of the materiality of identity and personhood, their intersubjective constitution, and how material artifacts both constitute and are made meaningful by the practices of social actors. By such investigations, I seek to understand how political authority was emically defined, understood, and enacted in the Tarascan State, allowing for potential cross-cultural comparisons of how political regimes and actors aimed to redefine social relations in their favor.

Education
PHD, ANTHROPOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA (2008)
MA, ANTHROPOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA (2003)
BA, ANTHROPOLOGY, OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, SUMMA CUM LAUDE (2000)
Teaching Experience Franklin University, Columbus, Ohio

Adjunct Professor, May 2010 to present
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, responsible for all aspects of instruction, ranging from developing and delivering lectures, leading student discussion, course management, and evaluation.

The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio

Adjunct Professor, May 2011 to present
Researcher/scholar affiliated with Anthropology Department, available for teaching opportunities. I have given a guest lecture attended by faculty and students.

University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

Teaching Assistant, August 2001 – May 2004.
Six semesters of experience as a teaching assistant in the Department of Anthropology. Three semesters of experience developing course syllabi, teaching discussion courses, designing lesson plans, preparing study guides and exams, and grading and keeping records of grades. Duties the remainder of the six semesters included preparing study guides and exams, leading review sessions and assisting students, and grading and keeping records of grades. Courses taught include Maya and Aztec Civilization, Development of World Civilization, and Introduction to Archaeology.

University of Illinois, Champaign, IL
Teaching Assistant, August 2000 – May 2001.
Two semesters of experience as a teaching assistant in the Department of Anthropology. Courses taught include World Archaeology and Aztec Civilization.

Field and Research Experience

Erongarícuaro, Michoacán, Mexico Co-Principal Investigator and Field Director of the 2005 field season of the project “Investigating the Expansion and Consolidation of the Tarascan State: Proposal for Fieldwork at Erongarícuaro, Michoacán, Mexico.”

Artifact Analysis, 2006

Artifact Analysis, 2003.

Survey and Excavation, 2001.

Publications and Presentations
Books
In Process
Tarascan Historicity: Narrative Structure, Poiesis, and the Construction of the Past in the Case of the Two Tariacuris. Manuscript submitted for publication Spring, 2013; I am in contact with a press.
 
 
Publications
In Review
Places to Go and Social Worlds to Constitute: the Itinerar(ies) of Tarascan Obsidian Idols in Prehispanic Mexico In Objects in Motion: Object Itineraries, edited by Rosemary A. Joyce and Susan D. Gillespie. Manuscript submitted for review, for publication by the School of American Research, Santa Fe.
 
In Press
The Impact of La Memoria de Don Melchor Caltzin (1543) on Tarascan Historiography and Ethnohistoric Modeling of Tarascan State Formation. Accepted by the journal Ethnohistory to be published October, 2013.
 
2012
The Encompassment of Subordinate Lords in the Tarascan Kingdom: Materiality, Identity, and Power In Identity and Power in Mesoamerica: Current Theory and Practice in Archaeology, edited by Eleanor Harrison-Buck, pp. 90-102. University of Utah Press, Foundations of Archaeological Inquiry Series.
 
2008
Tarascan Kingship: the Production of Hierarchy in the Prehispanic Patzcuaro Basin, Mexico. PhD dissertation, Department of Anthropology, University of Florida. Available online through the University of Florida Libraries.
 
2008
The Cultural Logic of Hierarchy in the Tarascan State: History as Ideology in the Relación de Michoacán. Ancient Mesoamerica 19:231-241.
 
2006
Investigating the Expansion and Consolidation of the Tarascan State: Fieldwork at Erongarícuaro, Michoacán, México. Report submitted to the Foundation for Mesoamerican Studies, Inc., March. Accessible Online
 
2006
Proyecto Erongarícuaro. Informe técnico parcial al Consejo de Arqueología, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia. Temporada II. May. With Helen P. Pollard.
 
2003
History and Hierarchy in the Prehispanic Tarascan State: a syntagmatic analysis of the Relación de Michoacán. MA thesis, Department of Anthropology, University of Florida. Available online through the University of Florida Libraries.
 
 
Conference Presentations
2013
Re-Envisioning Tarascan Temporalities and Landscapes: historical being, archaeological representation, and investigating social processes in the Lake Patzcuaro Basin, Mexico Paper presented at Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG) Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, May 10. With Christopher J. Stawski.
 
2012
Places to Go and Social Worlds to Constitute: Itinerar(ies) of Tarascan Obsidian Idols in Prehispanic Mexico. Paper presented as part of Short Seminar entitled ÒObjects in MotionÓ organized by Rosemary A. Joyce and Susan D. Gillespie at the School for Advanced Research, Santa Fe, May 7-10.
 
2012
The Impact of La Memoria de Don Melchor Caltzin (1543) on Tarascan Historiography and the Use of the Ethnohistoric Record in Modeling Tarascan State Formation. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Memphis, TN, April 19.
 
2010
Splitting the Gods: the Significatory Power of Obsidian "Idols" in the Prehispanic Tarascan Kingdom. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, St. Louis, MO, April 17.
 
2009
Syntagmatic-Paradigmatic Approaches to Indigenous Historicities: an Introduction. Paper presented at the American Society of Ethnohistory Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, October 2, 2009. With Jalh Dulanto.
 
2009
Legendary History in the Relación de Michoacán: Mexico's Pachacuti and the Quetzalcoatl that Wasn't. Paper presented at the American Society of Ethnohistory Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, October 2, 2009.
 
2007
Representing and Practicing Hierarchy in the Prehispanic Tarascan State. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association in Washington D.C., December.
 
2006
History, Ideology, and Problematic Assumptions in the Ethnohistoric Inquiry into the Development of the Tarascan State, paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, April 2006, San Juan Puerto Rico.
 
2004
Hierarchy, History, and Ideology in the Tarascan State: a Structuralist Analysis of the Relación de Michoacán. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association in Atlanta, GA, December 16.
 
2004
Difference of Perception, Perception of Difference: Architecture and Hierarchy in Ancient West Mexico. Paper presented at the Annual Midwest Mesoamericanist Meetings of Archaeology and Ethnohistory in Lexington, KY, March 13.
 
2002
Altars and Representations of Houses in Olmec Architecture, and their Role in the Negotiation of Rulership. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association in New Orleans, LA, November 20.
 
Awards

Dissertation Fieldwork Grant awarded by the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research in April 2005, for sourcing and dating of artifacts recovered during fieldwork at Erongarícuaro, Michoacán, Mexico, during the 2005 field season.

General Research Grant awarded in December, 2004 by the Foundation for the Advancement of Mesoamerican Studies, Inc. (FAMSI) for project “Investigating the Expansion and Consolidation of the Tarascan State: Proposal for Fieldwork at Erongarícuaro, Michoacán, Mexico,” summer of 2005.

Polly and Paul Doughty Research Award, Summer 2003, presented by the Department of Anthropology of the University of Florida.

Potential Courses

Introductory Level Undergraduate Courses: Introduction to Archaeology, World Archaeology/Civilization, General Anthropology

Intermediate Undergraduate Courses: Mesoamerican Archaeology, Maya and Aztec Civilizations, New World Prehistory

Upper Level Undergraduate/Graduate Courses: Archaeological Theory, Anthropological Theory, Seminar on State Formation, Seminar on the Relation Between Archaeology and Ethnohistory (or a separate course on ethnohistory and the analysis of documentary evidence), and a Seminar on Materiality, Agency, and Archaeological Interpretation

Professional Affiliations American Anthropological Association. (2002 – present)

Society for American Archaeology. (2004 – present)
Copyright © 2013 David L. Haskell